The Sperm, Egg and Embryo Donation (SEED) Trust Advice, support and information on donation

Embryo Donor FAQs

Ask your clinic or the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) for more information on who can help you, where they are and what type of medical research is carried out.
Ask your clinic or the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) for more information on who can help you, where they are and what type of medical research is carried out.
Clinics will usually only accept three or more embryos as the success rate for freeze/thaw is about 50%. If you only have one or two embryos then it’s highly unlikely that you will be able to donate them. You will need to contact your clinic in the first instance as you will need to be screened and counselled accordingly (as donors now, not recipients) before the embryos can be donated.
If you have frozen embryos in clinic storage which you then decide to donate you can receive compensation of up to £35 for each subsequent clinic visit. This sum is to cover any financial losses in connection with your donation. If you have higher expenses then there is scope to claim more. Some clinics may reimburse your embryo storage costs.
Embryos can be frozen for 10 years and clinics will contact those with embryos in storage at least once a year.
Usually the female donor has to be aged between 18 and 35, and the male donor has to be aged between 18 and 40 – the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority’s Exceptional Circumstances guidelines may be used at the clinic’s discretion to waive this.
Contact a clinic in the first instance as they may have potential recipients. We can help by contacting other clinics to check availability and demand.
Yes. Most donors’ conditions are connected to issues around religion and culture. In the case of known donation, the donation is conditional upon it being used by a particular recipient.
This will depend on how the consent form was completed at the time of the original treatment. Your clinic can advise you accordingly.
This will depend on how the consent form was completed at the time of the original treatment. Your clinic can advise you accordingly.
Clinics recommend that all parties are consulted for an up-to-date situation as the circumstances have changed from when the consent form was originally completed. If necessary, the clinic ethics committee will be consulted and/or legal advice sought.

This will depend on how the consent form was completed at the time of the original treatment. Your clinic can advise you accordingly.